However, the employer must inform the employee in writing of the essential points of the employment relationship: the identity of the two parties, the place of work, the position to be taken and the payment. “The courts require clear and explicit language to enter into such a (fixed-term) contract and will interpret any ambiguity strictly contrary to the interests of the employer. It seems to me that a court should be particularly vigilant when an employee works for several years under a series of so-called fixed-term contracts. Ending them in such situations violates the “public interest”, so it is not acceptable. The parties are free to include in the contract all the clauses on which they agree, with the exception of those that comply with the mandatory provisions of the laws and regulations (e.B. Discrimination clauses) and those of the branch contract applicable to the company. . . .